Daily Archives: January 26, 2018

OCD – A Devised Theater Piece

Tap. One two three four five six seven eight nine ten.
Tap. One two three four five six seven eight nine ten.
Goodnight Papa. Papa goodnight. Papa goodnight. Goodnight Papa.
Papa goodnight. Goodnight Papa. Goodnight Papa. Papa goodnight.

No, no, no. Not right! Mama is going to die. Mama is going to die.
Again, Again, Again. From the start.

I went to see a performance on OCD last night. It was great, filled with tears and laughter, anxiety and tension, very much. I can’t help thinking about many OCD clients I have seen in my clinical work, especially those that I’m still seeing this week, and some earlier on. They are living in this every, single, day, and, night.

The actors have done very well, sharply and vividly demonstrated the intense emotion felt by OCD sufferers. I highly recommend anyone who doesn’t really understand OCD to see it, especially those who think “I’m just a bit OCD” to see it. Check if the tickets are available here.

Before I went, I even thought about inviting my clients to see it. Now I’m really wondering for those who have been suffering from it for more than 5-6 years, how they would feel when they see this…

A few things that I want to point out regarding OCD, which are nicely and clearly presented in this performance…

  • It is always about “making sure”. They can’t tolerate uncertainty. Yet in this world, there is no such thing as 100% sure.
  • It’s always about “feeling right”. The comfortable, right feeling is what they are seeking. They can’t tolerate discomfort, that leads to anxiety and fear, so much anxiety and fear that are unbearable.
  • Quite often the sufferers find their own thought (obsession) and behaviour (compulsion) are ridiculous too, but they still can’t help it. It’s not about reasoning on an intellectual level, but it’s the psychological and emotion impacts on them.
  • It can be highly disrupting to the sufferer’s life, and more, to their immediate family.

Things that I want to add…

  • The best psychological intervention is “Exposure Response Prevention” (it’s a very straightforward treatment, refer here)
  • But before the treatment begins, a lot of preparation has to be done, being motivated enough to tolerate the discomfort when one is not allowed to perform the rituals.
  • Seek help as soon as you can. Many patients that we see, came to us around 3-5 years after some initial signs showed. By the time they were here, the disorder is rather aggressive and disabling, and surely, difficult to treat.
  • If you can overcome your longstanding OCD, you can overcome anything. This is what I think. And I sincerely believe it.